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How a Navy SEAL Sets up his AR | Tactical Rifleman


Hey guys, how’s it going? This is Jason with Tactical Rifleman. Hey, but before we get started don’t forget to hit the subscribe button and the little bell notification button. That way you get notified of all the new videos and content we’re putting out and you don’t miss anything week to week. Alright this week, we’re gonna talk about my own AR-15 setup. The setup I carry personally for my own home defense is not too different from the setup that I carried in the teams. In the SEAL Teams, we are limited to the inventory that we carry for our weapons. We can personalize it to a certain degree, but for the most part when you get out, it doesn’t tend to stray from that setup at all. I have a few different things that I just wanted to go over and show you guys how I carry it personally. I think that every guy is gonna set up their AR depending on their own shooting style and how they like to flow from front to back on the rifle how they like to carry it. So I’m just going to show you guys a few things that based on my shooting style and preference how I’d set up my own personal AR-15. So on my DPMS upper and lower I wrapped it with a Daniel Defense Pinned Rail System. It’s a 14 and a half inch barrel. But with the Dead Air Break that is fixed to the front puts it at that 16 inch legal limit or legal level. The Daniel Defense Pinned A Frame actually gives me more real estate on my upper that way it doesn’t stop at the the A frame front sight. My picatinny rail pushes forward of it giving me more real estate to push my Surefire flashlight or my grip a little bit forward of that. Daniel Defense is the only company that had done that. So I like having a lot more real estate just for options on where I can place things along the rail system. Front to back on the right hand side, I’ve got a Surefire flashlight. It’s pad initiated from the top that way if I have a nice good C-Grip on the rifle I can initiate the flashlight from the top. What I like about this Surefire light in particular is the ease in which it switches from white light to IR. If you can look in here, it’s just a lift and a turn. Unfortunately, I’d have to use my off shooting hand to do that, or I can just easily reach in with my with my non-shooting hand reach and turn it. It’s a little of an evolution, but it’s the closest and most convenient thing I can see from moving from white light to IR on my Surefire flashlight. On the other side, I’ve got a Ryker Grip. Now a lot of you guys have seen the old school grips on the bottom, the small finger stops, the big pole that’s sitting on the bottom… The Ryker Grip is something that I found that’s kind of new on the market and I really like it. It gives me a chance to get that good ergonomic grip that I have on my off shooting hand. I’ve got a little bit of a injury issue with my off shooting hand and having that economic grip allows me to pull it in a lot tighter with this Ryker Grip. It’s a tension that I don’t get from the underneath mounted forward hand grips, and I really like this grip a lot. Moving down, I’m just running a basic Aimpoint for an optic. They’re easy batteries to get it’s a pretty reliable red dot sight. I enjoy the ease and the familiarity with the Aimpoint. A lot of guys are running the smaller EOTech’s I don’t think there’s anything wrong with those holographic sights, just for my own personal preference I like the Aimpoints. I like seeing that red dot, I like dimming it down. Moving back I’ve put in my own personal Wilson Combat Bolt Release. So it’s a little bit bigger. I think a lot of you guys referred to it as a ping-pong paddle on your service weapons. I like it. It’s just a little bit bigger and bulkier and I can really if I want to get a mag in, hitting that nice and hard it never had any problems with a new upgraded bolt release. On the back, I’ve got a CAA buttstock. Now, it’s a little bit bigger and not as sexy as some of the stuff you guys have might have seen. I like it because it does carry a lot of accessories. It gives me a nice even cheek weld. I get a really good feel on the cheeks when I get a good sight picture and it’s something that I’m used to. Additionally, it holds a few extra batteries for any kind of optics that you’re running. It holds AA’s and AAA’s, CR123’s. it will hold any kind of battery that you are looking for refilling on the optics that you’re carrying. If you have some battery space, if you put batteries in there I just advise you to throw some earplugs in there Just so the batteries don’t run or kind of roll around it adds a little bit of weight to the rear, but it really isn’t that noticeable. Additionally, what I like about the CAA buttstock, is that if I ever wanted to run if I ever wanted to put something on my non-shooting side like a tourniquet or a GPS Foretrex, a Garmin Foretrex. It’s pretty easy just to kind of strap it on the back like that. Another thing I wanted to talk about is I upgraded my charging handle, Now some of you guys with your service rifles have the opportunity to do this. If you look here the charging handle what you might see on your own personal service rifles or non operated rifle Is that your charging handle just has a little bit of a pin. I like that I like the bigger charging handle with more of a grip on it. So I upgraded mine and that way with gloves I could just grab it, throw it back and there’s no issue with my hand slipping off my charging handle. Up top here, I really couldn’t find any rear sight that I liked except for the old-school carrying handle on a regular M4 that you guys might have seen and what I did is I shaved off the back rear sight of the carrying handle and just put it on the back of this. That way I got a good rear sight and front sight in case of an optic failure. Now, one thing I see a lot of guys really struggling with that, honestly, I continue to struggle with myself is the sling and sling placement. Now on here it just really depends on your mission set where the sling is gonna go and what do I mean by that? Basically, sometimes I want my sling points a little bit closer together and sometimes I want a little bit spread out. Hell, sometimes I’ll run them even from the bottom depending on how I want to carry my rifle when it’s laying if I’m doing trenches and drills or training or something like that. So it’s fixed in the back with a sling mount, but in the front, I have a removable sling carrying ring. That way I can have it modular and move it around the rifle as I kind of change moods, really. But the one sling that I do like that I’ve had, both in the teams and personally, are the Viking Slings. These are light, thin. They’re not bulky. There’s no pad on them. I don’t really carry one with a pad. I’ve seen slings with pads on them. This thing doesn’t get in the way and actually seconds as a weapons retention system. So when I crank down on my Viking Sling it’ll actually pull it closer to my body. So when I do transitions if it’s an extended transition I’ll reach up, pull this, tighten the Viking sling, when I’m ready to roll again I just pull the release cord that comes with it and it opens back up again. That’s what I like to run and it just seems to work in 80%, 90% of the situations I find myself in this with this particular rifle. Yeah, so this is my setup. It’s pretty basic. Nothing fancy. Just the little things that matter and they got to matter to you. That’s all I got for this week guys any questions or comments please leave them below If you liked this video make sure to like, comment, and subscribe. Also, make sure you follow us on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter so you don’t miss out on anything.

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